Racism and the “New” Identity Politics

“Only white people can be racist.” This is the conclusion drawn by many activists of the modern day, who exert their various energies toward the goal of attaining justice for society. The reasoning goes that racism is prejudice plus institutionalized power, so only white persons can be racist. Let’s look at whether this is true and what it really means.

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If You Vote, You Have No Right to Complain

Imagine that you made a bet with someone. It doesn’t matter what the bet is over–it may be the outcome of a football game or the toss of the dice. But whichever game, and for whatever reason aside, you and a rival enter into a wager. The stakes are as follows: The loser’s house will be burned to the ground. Now, assuming that you take the bet, you are aware that you are entering a wager where someone’s house will be burned down. To such a bettor, the desired outcome is a house burning down. Of course, you will surely wish that it shan’t be your house, but you will wish that a house burn down. You’ll just wish it’s the house of your rival. Notice I have said nothing of intentions or motives. Morally speaking, it does not matter why you are taking the bet. Maybe you need the winnings for emergency surgery or to make your car payment. But the reason does not matter. No matter what the outcome, someone’s property will be destroyed for the benefit of a short-term gain by the winning party.

It is despicable to take a bet where you know that no matter what, someone’s house will be destroyed. What would be more despicable still would be to delude yourself into thinking that your rival will be better off, and/or that the destruction of his house is either secretly benefiting him or the charred rubble is just an illusion. Of course, if you were the loser you would not fall for this assurance; you would recognize the lie for what it is and you would want your house back. If this situation seems absurd, it is only because I have substituted the words “house” and “wager” for “liberty” and “vote.”

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Strike at the Root: Understanding the Source of Problems in Our Society

by John Everett
January 2016

[Also available from Amazon]

No one can deny that there are many problems facing us today. Poverty, illiteracy, corruption, and so on are enduring obstacles in our lives. Many people do their best to combat these problems, but in order to do this effectively we have to first figure out what is causing these problems. The trouble is, people can’t seem to agree on the causes of most of these issues. It seems that everyone has different answers. Depending on the person you ask, you might hear the answers: because of the poor, because of immigrants, because of rich corporations, because of lobbying, because of corrupt politicians, and so on. What I would like to discuss now, however, is an answer that hasn’t been very popular but is steadily gaining traction. There is a radical movement that puts forth the idea that government in general is the primary cause of most societal problems. Not a certain Government in particular, mind you. Not a Republican Government or a Democratic Government. Not a parliamentary or congressional Government. Just government in any of its myriad forms. Such a simplistic worldview suffers from a fundamental problem, and I want now to explain what it is.

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The Divine Principle and True Understanding of God’s Word

日本語の訳がここにあります。

(Also available in paperback or Kindle via Amazon)

The Divine Principle and True Understanding of God’s Word

By John Everett

12/13/2014

In the 20th century there emerged a prolific religious leader named Reverend Sun Myung Moon who founded the Unification church in 1954. Over a lifetime of tireless and heartfelt service to others, he left behind a large corpus of religious teachings. As with many great leaders, he was often a subject of controversy during his life. His writings were said by Christians to be heretical, as they allegedly contradicted the teachings in the Bible; many people are afraid of change and will denounce something new. This paper will dissect Reverend Moon’s teachings in his book Exposition of the Divine Principle, especially the second chapter “The Human Fall,” and will determine whether or not these teachings are sound doctrine or are indeed heretical. And furthermore, what greater ramifications would such soundness or heresy imply?

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Is an End to Poverty Possible?

Welcome back to school, everyone! This was my research paper for last semester. In it, I detailed the causes of poverty and present a solution. I was researching this paper while debating Mr. S and what I found greatly helped in regards to this paper. If you find any errors, or have any feedback whatsoever, please leave a comment. Thank you.

John Everett

Dana Killmeyer

ENG 102-1045

05 May 2014

The Light at the End of the Tunnel: Is an End to Poverty Possible?

 

What if you were told that it’s possible to not just help the poor, but to eliminate poverty altogether? If so, how could this be done? The answers are much simpler than you think. No matter whether we look at poverty in a rich country like the United States or a comparatively poor country like China, underlying causes always remain the same. More amazingly, not only is this true for every country on Earth today, but for history as well. When all is said and done, the one common factor in poverty, no matter where or when you look, is excessive government intervention in the market. The solution to poverty, simply enough, is liberty. That’s it. There are no complicated mathematical formulas.

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To Change the World

This was a diagnostic writing I did for my English composition class. I had one hour to complete it; this is the finished essay.

 

Margaret Mead said, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” However, it is hard to believe that just a few people can make a significant difference. Given the many great challenges that the world faces, it seems impossible to change anything for the better unless one can attract a lot of people and spend a lot of money.

Assignment: Can a small group of concerned individuals have a significant impact on the world? Plan and write an essay in which you develop your point of view on this issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading, studies, experience, or observations.

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Economics Is Super Hard, Y’all (Part III)

“Asking a liberal where prices and wages come from is like asking a six-year old where babies come from.” -Thomas Sowell

It’s all come to this, the final showdown. The third and final part of my debate with Mr. S begins on page 2 after a brief aside. This third part contains a lot of graphs and charts that present data in an easy-to-digest form, but also has enormous walls of text. Wait, that’s how I’m going to start this? Let me try this again: Inside you’ll find many of my arguments presented with pictures to visually represent vast amounts of data, making it easier to see and understand. (There, that’s much more fun!)

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Economics Is Super Hard, Y’all (Part II)

There is only one difference between a bad economist and a good one: the bad economist confines himself to the visible effect; the good economist takes into account both the effect that can be seen and those effects that must be foreseen.

-Frédéric Bastiat

When dealing with the economic effects of a policy it is paramount that we are able to see the unseen. In my debate with Mr. S last week several studies on minimum wage effects were referred to but not sufficiently analyzed (my bad). Especially in regards to the Krueger & Card study, it is important to realize that economists with an agenda will make the info say what they want the info to say. For example: the gender gap!

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Economics Is Super Hard, Y’all (Part I)

EconCollage

“The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.” Leo Tolstoy

In case you haven’t heard, lately there’s been a lot of debate concerning the minimum wage. Opinions are varied but among those who are most outspoken on the matter, most want the wage to be raised to $11 per hour. Every side brings up important points, but what most human beings forget to do when debating is to let the facts dictate opinion instead of the other way around. This may bother you, and if it does I hope very much to convince you, but I believe that the minimum wage ought to be abolished. As in, a $0 minimum wage. And about 50% of economists agree on that point. If you don’t, but you’re open-minded and willing to learn, read on.

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